Topic: strategic Plan Project

Level: Public Relations homework help

Style: vancouver

Pages: 22 Pages

spacing: Double

Pages: 22 Pages

Strategic Planning Document (Assignment):


(Given that public relations often defined as a “planned process to influence public opinion,” it is vital that the public relations professional develop skills in strategic planning. Several models of strategic planning have been adapted for use in public relations; all are based upon research. Each student will develop a public relations strategic plan for a target organization. This strategic plan will be accompanied by a proposal for the development of a digital press kit, a commonly used public relations tactic).


 


What I want form you right know is to write a strategic plan document in up to 22 pages in 4-5 days. Kindly, read everything to understand exactly what my professor wants. iMarks did the scenario and the professor love it. So, I will attach the scenario to complete the plan. But please to don’t forget to take advantage of EXPO 2020 that will launch in Dubai where is hun of Fly Emirates (my client). 


 


 


 


 


 


Public Relations Foundations



  • A brief look at the development of public relations strategies.

  • Prepared by class’s instructor.

  • Use as an adjunct to Seitel


 


A PR-focused look at strategic planning:



  • Mission

    • What is our business?

    • What should it be?



  • Goals

    • Long term.

    • Support mission.

    • Generally: reputation, relationship or task.

    • Usually lack specific metrics or metrics are long-term.



  • Objectives

    • Clear and explicitly measureable.

    • Time specific.

    • Generally: awareness, acceptance or action.



  • Strategies

    • How you will meet your objectives:

      • Ex: special event.

      • Ex: improved service.



    • Tactics

      • The tools you will use to implement strategies:

        • Press releases are tactics.








 


Strategy and Tactics:



  • Strategy = how you will accomplish your objectives.

  • Tactics = the tools you will use to implement your strategy.


 


Let’s look at World War II – U.S./allies



  • Mission

    • Stop the spread of repressive regimes and liberate repressed populations.



  • Goal

    • Defeat the German regime lead by Hitler.



  • Objective

    • Liberate occupied France.



  • Strategy

    • Normandy Invasion (D-Day).



  • Tactics

    • Troops, planes, etc.




 


Typology of public relations strategies:



  • Action strategies:

    • Organizational performance.

    • Audience participation.

    • Special events.

    • Alliances and coalitions.

    •  

    • Strategic philanthropy.

    •  



  • Communication strategies:

    •  

    • Newsworthy information.

    •  



  • Interpersonal communication:

    • Face-to-face.

    • Provides opportunity for interaction.



  • Organizational media:

    • Published by the client organization.

      • Both internal and external.



    • News media:

      • Non-paid press release.

      • Third party publisher.

        • Provides credibility.



      • Advertising and promotional media:

        • Paid and controlled media.

          • Generally external.










 


Final thoughts on PR strategy:



  • Must be research-based.

  • Do not rely on “better communication” alone.

  • Third parties are vital to solid public relations strategies.

  • Think about what will really move your issue or customer, not just impress media.

  • Think about evaluation up front.

  • Warning signs of a bad strategy document:

    • “We need a media blitz”

    • “Let’s get some buzz going”

    • “If they only understood us”

    • “We are different and better”



  • Perception is all that matters:

    • If someone perceives something is new: it is.

    • If someone perceives someone is guilty: he is.

    • Emotions often trump “facts.”



  • Public relations is more credible than advertising.

  • The use of third parties is vital to building credibility.

    • Always consider the use of alliances and coalitions in every public relations plan.

    •  




Postscript: sources of third parties:



  • Align your strategy, messages and tactics with third parties from this (partial) menu:

    • Celebrities

    • Government

    • Non-government organizations

    • Business leaders

    • Non-profits

    • Local community organizers

    • Expert sources for technology, medical, etc.

    • High profile bloggers

    • Men and women from “Main Street”




 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Developing Public Relations Strategies


 



  • Strategy = how you will meet your objectives.

  • Tactics = the tools you will use.


 


For example:


Objective = shelter from the storm.


Strategy = build a house.


Tactics = lumber, nails and hammer.


 


Two broad categories:



  •  

  •  


 


Action and Response Strategies 



  1. Proactive:



  1. In this situation, the organization is “charting its own course.”

  2. Select conditions and timeline that fit your interests, in keeping with the environment.

  3. Generally used in product launches.




    1. Example: New versions of Windows.


  1. Reactive:


    1. In this situation, the organization is not in complete control.

    2. These are measures that respond to the environment, both problems and opportunities.

    3. Often used to restore trust or reputation.



 


Proactive Action Strategies



  • Organizational performance:

    • You must advocate for quality for customers

    • PR can’t deliver unless quality and service is meeting customer expectations.

    • You must also advocate for social responsibility

    • Often, organizations need to change -- you can help lead that change by bringing information into the organization.



  • Audience participation -- involves two-way communication and engages your publics in the communication activities.

    • Examples: tours, samples, etc.

    • Create a compelling answer this question: “What is in this for me?”

    • Use “triggering events” to create action today!

    • Include data-gathering and feedback.





    • Used to gain visibility with key publics.

    • Often used in community relations programming.

    • Key factor: program must have a logical link with your mission. Example: health screening events by pharmacies.

    • Can be highly cost effective!



  • Strategic Philanthropy.

    • More than charity or a giveaway!

    • Organizations support causes aligned with the issues/needs of their customers and employees.

    • Example -- if your customers are senior citizens, support AARP.

    • Example -- Lilly and mental health.

    • Key success factors:

      • Give something that is more valuable to others than it is costly to you.

      • Give something that you already own.

      • Give gifts in small units over time to maximize benefit.



    • Activism -- generally associated with causes or social movements, such as the anti-war movement or the environment.

      • Tactics: marches, boycotts, strikes, etc. All very “media friendly.”

      • Carefully weight pros and cons.

      • Avoid “unintended consequences.”



    • Effective Communication.

      • Shift from the actions of the organization to communications strategies.

      • Three key communications strategies:

        •  

        • Newsworthy information.

        •  








 


Communication Strategies


 



  • Publicity - the attention given by the news media to your organization.

  • Provides a critical third party endorsement to your organization due to the third party credibility provided by the media.

  • PR people often serve as “internal reporters” to identify publicity opportunities.


 



  • Newsworthy information.

  • Use classic journalistic elements of news:

    • OR, the following:

      • Conflict

      • Costs

      • Causes

      • Controversy



    • Timeliness - TODAY is the thing!

    • Fame, plus many more: money, sex, power!

    • The media are the “gatekeepers” who control the flow of information. They decide what is newsworthy.

    • PR people should predict newsworthiness based on:

      • Your activities and messages.

      • The media’s current agenda.

      • The interests of key publics.



    • Transparent communications - a new and “hot” concept:

      • Open and observable activity by an organization helps publics understand and support actions.

      • Move beyond “facts” to “reasons for actions.”

      • “No surprises” is a key guiding principle.

      • Example: posting all product safety data.






 


Response Strategies



  • Reactive Public Relations Strategies:

  • When a crisis hits, organizations must develop strategies to gain public understanding and restore reputation and trust.

  • There are multiple approaches that have been proven to work.

  • Pre-emptive action strategy -- take action before your opponent does.

  • Pre-buttal - a proven “classic”

    • When bad news comes, make sure YOU tell it.

    • All other versions of the story compete against the first - make yours the first on the wires/social media.

    • Use when publics will inevitably hear the bad news

    • Examples: plant closing, product recall, executive arrest, etc.



  • Offensive response strategies

    • Attack -- when accusers “go too far.”

    • Embarrassment -- Romney “flip flops.”

    • Shock - deliberate agitation, such as tactics used by PETA.

    • Threat - used rarely, perhaps best expressed: “we will exhaust ALL our legal options if our opponents take action.”




 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 



  • Defensive response strategies:

    • Denial -- use when you case is strong.

    • Excuse -- provocation (no choice), accident, victim or association (inherited).

    • Justification -- we did what we did for a good reason.



  • Diversionary response strategies -- your attempt to change the focus:

    • Concession - give your publics something the want

    • Ingratiation - “tossing a bone” &*!*&(@

    • Disassociation - create distance from a problem, especially when a policy or procedure was not followed

    • Re-labeling - offer an agreeable name, but don’t resort to “doublespeak” or “spin”



  • Vocal commiseration -- very crucial to show the right emotional concern:

    • Concern -- not indifferent, but also not admitting guilt

    • Condolence -- formally express grief, without admitting guilt.

    • Regret -- sorrowful, but specifically disclaim liability.

    • Apology - take responsibility and ask to be forgiven; first step to rebuilding a relationship. Must be complete and real.



  • Rectifying behavior strategies - often overlooked, a chance for PR to show leadership:

    •  

    • Corrective action.

    • Restitution -- $$$$.

    • Repentance - change of heart + actions.



  • Strategic inaction -- in select situations for certain organizations it can be highly effective for the following reasons:

    •  

    •  

    •  




Note: Not the same as “no comment.”


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Action and Response Strategies


 


 


A Classic Crisis Cycle


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Surprise, Surprise, Surprise!


 


 



  • Federal officials said they thoroughly examined the acceleration reports and could not find evidence of an electronic problem. Instead, investigators with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said the evidence showed that cases in which owners complained about ineffective brakes were most likely caused by "pedal misapplication," in which the driver stepped on the accelerator instead of the brakes.

  • Toyota said the report should "further reinforce confidence in the safety of Toyota and Lexus vehicles" and "put to rest unsupported speculation" about the company's electronic throttle control systems, which are "well-designed and well-tested to ensure that a real world, un-commanded acceleration of the vehicle cannot occur."


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Why Is This Image Here?


 


 


 


Here where we starts:


And don’t forget the advantage of expo 2020


 


Fly Emirates


Strategic Plan


 


Background and History


Fly Emirates is an airline situated in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The Emirates is a subsidiary of The Emirates Group, a government owned investment. It is the Middle East’s largest airline operating over 3,000 flights per week from its hub in Dubai International Airport to more than 150 in 50 countries over the world.


Direction



  • The Fly Emirates will assess consumer and community needs to identify gaps or needed shifts in service delivery. This assessment will serve as the basis for expanding or adding new services.

  • The Fly Emirates will explore the feasibility of expanding the organization’s visibility in the community and making greater use of volunteers.


Mission


The Fly Emirates introduces a new sharper mission statement in this strategic plan. The new statement reflects two dimensions that define the purposes of organization and its intended contribution towards corporate governance and social responsibility. The new dimensions are:



  • To uphold highest standards of corporate governance in the airline industry and then ensure that all stakeholders including the customers, government, society and shareholders who constitute our business are satisfied.


Goals



  • To contribute positively in the corporate social responsibility, specifically, to ensure that no victims or products are trafficked using our airlines.


Objectives



  • To be the world’s largest and preferred passenger carrier by 2020


Strategies



  • To uphold highest standards of corporate governance, the Emirates will abide by the principles of Corporate Governance which are accountability, transparency, fairness and responsibility.

  • To establish 150 new destinations by 2020 hence doubling the number of flights from 3,000 to 6,000 per week.

  • Subsidized flight tickets


Tactics



  • The Emirates will utilize the existing satisfied and loyal customers to entice new customers.

  • The Emirate will also make use of the social media and networking sites.


 


Strategic Planning Document (Assignment):


(Given that public relations often defined as a “planned process to influence public opinion,” it is vital that the public relations professional develop skills in strategic planning. Several models of strategic planning have been adapted for use in public relations; all are based upon research. Each student will develop a public relations strategic plan for a target organization. This strategic plan will be accompanied by a proposal for the development of a digital press kit, a commonly used public relations tactic).


 


What I want form you right know is to write a strategic plan document in up to 22 pages in 4-5 days. Kindly, read everything to understand exactly what my professor wants. iMarks did the scenario and the professor love it. So, I will attach the scenario to complete the plan. But please to don’t forget to take advantage of EXPO 2020 that will launch in Dubai where is hun of Fly Emirates (my client). 


 


 


 


 


 


Public Relations Foundations



  • A brief look at the development of public relations strategies.

  • Prepared by class’s instructor.

  • Use as an adjunct to Seitel


 


A PR-focused look at strategic planning:



  • Mission

    • What is our business?

    • What should it be?



  • Goals

    • Long term.

    • Support mission.

    • Generally: reputation, relationship or task.

    • Usually lack specific metrics or metrics are long-term.



  • Objectives

    • Clear and explicitly measureable.

    • Time specific.

    • Generally: awareness, acceptance or action.



  • Strategies

    • How you will meet your objectives:

      • Ex: special event.

      • Ex: improved service.



    • Tactics

      • The tools you will use to implement strategies:

        • Press releases are tactics.








 


Strategy and Tactics:



  • Strategy = how you will accomplish your objectives.

  • Tactics = the tools you will use to implement your strategy.


 


Let’s look at World War II – U.S./allies



  • Mission

    • Stop the spread of repressive regimes and liberate repressed populations.



  • Goal

    • Defeat the German regime lead by Hitler.



  • Objective

    • Liberate occupied France.



  • Strategy

    • Normandy Invasion (D-Day).



  • Tactics

    • Troops, planes, etc.




 


Typology of public relations strategies:



  • Action strategies:

    • Organizational performance.

    • Audience participation.

    • Special events.

    • Alliances and coalitions.

    •  

    • Strategic philanthropy.

    •  



  • Communication strategies:

    •  

    • Newsworthy information.

    •  



  • Interpersonal communication:

    • Face-to-face.

    • Provides opportunity for interaction.



  • Organizational media:

    • Published by the client organization.

      • Both internal and external.



    • News media:

      • Non-paid press release.

      • Third party publisher.

        • Provides credibility.



      • Advertising and promotional media:

        • Paid and controlled media.

          • Generally external.










 


Final thoughts on PR strategy:



  • Must be research-based.

  • Do not rely on “better communication” alone.

  • Third parties are vital to solid public relations strategies.

  • Think about what will really move your issue or customer, not just impress media.

  • Think about evaluation up front.

  • Warning signs of a bad strategy document:

    • “We need a media blitz”

    • “Let’s get some buzz going”

    • “If they only understood us”

    • “We are different and better”



  • Perception is all that matters:

    • If someone perceives something is new: it is.

    • If someone perceives someone is guilty: he is.

    • Emotions often trump “facts.”



  • Public relations is more credible than advertising.

  • The use of third parties is vital to building credibility.

    • Always consider the use of alliances and coalitions in every public relations plan.

    •  




Postscript: sources of third parties:



  • Align your strategy, messages and tactics with third parties from this (partial) menu:

    • Celebrities

    • Government

    • Non-government organizations

    • Business leaders

    • Non-profits

    • Local community organizers

    • Expert sources for technology, medical, etc.

    • High profile bloggers

    • Men and women from “Main Street”




 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Developing Public Relations Strategies


 



  • Strategy = how you will meet your objectives.

  • Tactics = the tools you will use.


 


For example:


Objective = shelter from the storm.


Strategy = build a house.


Tactics = lumber, nails and hammer.


 


Two broad categories:



  •  

  •  


 


Action and Response Strategies 



  1. Proactive:



  1. In this situation, the organization is “charting its own course.”

  2. Select conditions and timeline that fit your interests, in keeping with the environment.

  3. Generally used in product launches.




    1. Example: New versions of Windows.


  1. Reactive:


    1. In this situation, the organization is not in complete control.

    2. These are measures that respond to the environment, both problems and opportunities.

    3. Often used to restore trust or reputation.



 


Proactive Action Strategies



  • Organizational performance:

    • You must advocate for quality for customers

    • PR can’t deliver unless quality and service is meeting customer expectations.

    • You must also advocate for social responsibility

    • Often, organizations need to change -- you can help lead that change by bringing information into the organization.



  • Audience participation -- involves two-way communication and engages your publics in the communication activities.

    • Examples: tours, samples, etc.

    • Create a compelling answer this question: “What is in this for me?”

    • Use “triggering events” to create action today!

    • Include data-gathering and feedback.





    • Used to gain visibility with key publics.

    • Often used in community relations programming.

    • Key factor: program must have a logical link with your mission. Example: health screening events by pharmacies.

    • Can be highly cost effective!



  • Strategic Philanthropy.

    • More than charity or a giveaway!

    • Organizations support causes aligned with the issues/needs of their customers and employees.

    • Example -- if your customers are senior citizens, support AARP.

    • Example -- Lilly and mental health.

    • Key success factors:

      • Give something that is more valuable to others than it is costly to you.

      • Give something that you already own.

      • Give gifts in small units over time to maximize benefit.



    • Activism -- generally associated with causes or social movements, such as the anti-war movement or the environment.

      • Tactics: marches, boycotts, strikes, etc. All very “media friendly.”

      • Carefully weight pros and cons.

      • Avoid “unintended consequences.”



    • Effective Communication.

      • Shift from the actions of the organization to communications strategies.

      • Three key communications strategies:

        •  

        • Newsworthy information.

        •  








 


Communication Strategies


 



  • Publicity - the attention given by the news media to your organization.

  • Provides a critical third party endorsement to your organization due to the third party credibility provided by the media.

  • PR people often serve as “internal reporters” to identify publicity opportunities.


 



  • Newsworthy information.

  • Use classic journalistic elements of news:

    • OR, the following:

      • Conflict

      • Costs

      • Causes

      • Controversy



    • Timeliness - TODAY is the thing!

    • Fame, plus many more: money, sex, power!

    • The media are the “gatekeepers” who control the flow of information. They decide what is newsworthy.

    • PR people should predict newsworthiness based on:

      • Your activities and messages.

      • The media’s current agenda.

      • The interests of key publics.



    • Transparent communications - a new and “hot” concept:

      • Open and observable activity by an organization helps publics understand and support actions.

      • Move beyond “facts” to “reasons for actions.”

      • “No surprises” is a key guiding principle.

      • Example: posting all product safety data.






 


Response Strategies



  • Reactive Public Relations Strategies:

  • When a crisis hits, organizations must develop strategies to gain public understanding and restore reputation and trust.

  • There are multiple approaches that have been proven to work.

  • Pre-emptive action strategy -- take action before your opponent does.

  • Pre-buttal - a proven “classic”

    • When bad news comes, make sure YOU tell it.

    • All other versions of the story compete against the first - make yours the first on the wires/social media.

    • Use when publics will inevitably hear the bad news

    • Examples: plant closing, product recall, executive arrest, etc.



  • Offensive response strategies

    • Attack -- when accusers “go too far.”

    • Embarrassment -- Romney “flip flops.”

    • Shock - deliberate agitation, such as tactics used by PETA.

    • Threat - used rarely, perhaps best expressed: “we will exhaust ALL our legal options if our opponents take action.”




 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 



  • Defensive response strategies:

    • Denial -- use when you case is strong.

    • Excuse -- provocation (no choice), accident, victim or association (inherited).

    • Justification -- we did what we did for a good reason.



  • Diversionary response strategies -- your attempt to change the focus:

    • Concession - give your publics something the want

    • Ingratiation - “tossing a bone” &*!*&(@

    • Disassociation - create distance from a problem, especially when a policy or procedure was not followed

    • Re-labeling - offer an agreeable name, but don’t resort to “doublespeak” or “spin”



  • Vocal commiseration -- very crucial to show the right emotional concern:

    • Concern -- not indifferent, but also not admitting guilt

    • Condolence -- formally express grief, without admitting guilt.

    • Regret -- sorrowful, but specifically disclaim liability.

    • Apology - take responsibility and ask to be forgiven; first step to rebuilding a relationship. Must be complete and real.



  • Rectifying behavior strategies - often overlooked, a chance for PR to show leadership:

    •  

    • Corrective action.

    • Restitution -- $$$$.

    • Repentance - change of heart + actions.



  • Strategic inaction -- in select situations for certain organizations it can be highly effective for the following reasons:

    •  

    •  

    •  




Note: Not the same as “no comment.”


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Action and Response Strategies


 


 


A Classic Crisis Cycle


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Surprise, Surprise, Surprise!


 


 



  • Federal officials said they thoroughly examined the acceleration reports and could not find evidence of an electronic problem. Instead, investigators with the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration said the evidence showed that cases in which owners complained about ineffective brakes were most likely caused by "pedal misapplication," in which the driver stepped on the accelerator instead of the brakes.

  • Toyota said the report should "further reinforce confidence in the safety of Toyota and Lexus vehicles" and "put to rest unsupported speculation" about the company's electronic throttle control systems, which are "well-designed and well-tested to ensure that a real world, un-commanded acceleration of the vehicle cannot occur."


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


 


Why Is This Image Here?


 


 


 


Here where we starts:


And don’t forget the advantage of expo 2020


 


Fly Emirates


Strategic Plan


 


Background and History


Fly Emirates is an airline situated in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. The Emirates is a subsidiary of The Emirates Group, a government owned investment. It is the Middle East’s largest airline operating over 3,000 flights per week from its hub in Dubai International Airport to more than 150 in 50 countries over the world.


Direction



  • The Fly Emirates will assess consumer and community needs to identify gaps or needed shifts in service delivery. This assessment will serve as the basis for expanding or adding new services.

  • The Fly Emirates will explore the feasibility of expanding the organization’s visibility in the community and making greater use of volunteers.


Mission


The Fly Emirates introduces a new sharper mission statement in this strategic plan. The new statement reflects two dimensions that define the purposes of organization and its intended contribution towards corporate governance and social responsibility. The new dimensions are:



  • To uphold highest standards of corporate governance in the airline industry and then ensure that all stakeholders including the customers, government, society and shareholders who constitute our business are satisfied.


Goals



  • To contribute positively in the corporate social responsibility, specifically, to ensure that no victims or products are trafficked using our airlines.


Objectives



  • To be the world’s largest and preferred passenger carrier by 2020


Strategies



  • To uphold highest standards of corporate governance, the Emirates will abide by the principles of Corporate Governance which are accountability, transparency, fairness and responsibility.

  • To establish 150 new destinations by 2020 hence doubling the number of flights from 3,000 to 6,000 per week.

  • Subsidized flight tickets


Tactics



  • The Emirates will utilize the existing satisfied and loyal customers to entice new customers.

  • The Emirate will also make use of the social media and networking sites.


 

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